Session 1 - Accurate phase measurement systems for sinewave signals

Eulalia Balestrieri


Eulalia Balestrieri

University of Sannio, Italy


Francesco Picariello


Francesco Picariello

University of Sannio, Italy


Abstract

One of the most important characteristics of a sinewave signal is its phase. The phase is the time (instant) for a given signal value on a waveform cycle. Usually, the phase is an expression of the relative time difference between two corresponding features (peaks or zero crossings) of two waveforms having the same frequency. The phase is used in several application fields for indirectly measuring displacement, strain, acceleration, power quality, and for characterizing circuits and components in the frequency domain.
The aim of the tutorial is to present a review of phase measurement systems for sinewave signals. At the beginning, the definition of the phase of a signal and the classification of the phase measurement systems available in the literature will be presented. Then, a short overview of the instrumentation based on event counting, modulation, and sampling based methods for measuring the phase of sinewaves will be carried out. At the end, an innovative method proposed by our laboratory at the University of Sannio (LESIM) in collaboration with NIST (USA) will be described.


Short Biography

Eulalia Balestrieri joined the Department of Engineering, University of Sannio, Benevento, Italy in 2018 as an Assistant Professor in electric and electronic measurement, where she has been involved in the research activities carried out at the Laboratory of Signal Processing and Measurement Information. She received the M.S. degree in software engineering and the Ph.D. degree in information engineering from the University of Sannio in 2003 and 2007, respectively. Her research interests include digital signal processing for measurement in telecommunications, data converter characterization, and medical measurements. She has authored and co-authored more than 50 scientific papers, published on international journals and conference proceedings and is a reviewer of international journals and conferences. Dr. Balestrieri is a member of IMS TC-25 Medical Measurement and IMS TC-10 Waveform Analysis, Generation and Measurement. She participated in the realization of three IEEE standards and is currently involved in the development of the new jitter standard.


Francesco Picariello (IEEE S'15, M'17) received the B.Sc. ('09) and M.Sc. ('12) (cum laude) degree in electronic engineering, from the University of Salerno, Faculty of Engineering. Then, he joined the research activities carried out at the Laboratory of Signal Processing and Measurement Information of the University of Sannio, Benevento, Italy. He received the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society Graduate Fellowship Award in 2015 for the project titled “Assurance of traceability for smartphone-based kinetic measurements”. He received the Ph.D. degree in Information Engineering from the University of Sannio in 2016 and the National Academic Qualification as Associate Professor in June 2020. He is currently working toward the Department of Engineering of the University of Sannio as Assistant Professor. His research interests include electrical and electronic instrumentation, data acquisition systems (DAQ) based on compressive sampling (CS), biomedical instrumentation, embedded systems, distributed measurement systems including wireless sensor networks (WSNs), and Internet-of-Things (IoT) systems. He has authored and co-authored more than 50 scientific papers, published on international journals and conference proceedings. He is a reviewer of international journals and conferences.

Session 2 - Wearable PPG sensor: best practices for metrological assessment

Francesco Scardulla

Department of Engineering, University of Palermo, Italy


Abstract

Wearable pulse rate sensors based on photoplethysmography (PPG) have become increasingly popular as they can detect several physiological parameters via a cheap and miniaturized device and nowadays they are integrated in lots of commercial products such as in smartwatches. However, despite the great potential of this technology in improving the continuous monitoring of physiological parameters for clinical purposes, it is still necessary to assess the metrological performance of the sensor to define in which clinical application it could be used and to date an effective standard does not exist.

Topic relevance

The PPG sensor can detect various physiological parameters, such as heart rate, representing an effective tool in improving the early diagnosis of several pathologies, increasing the general health status of patients and reducing the national costs related to healthcare. Nevertheless, the metrological assessment is not yet available and so PPG technology cannot be fully exploited. The Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement seems to be unsuitable for the purpose as the PPG technology presents too many influencing parameters. For this reason, the scientific community is raising the point, proposing some guidelines and calling for a standard, which does not exist. The aim of this webinar is to highlight and raise a practical problem, which is the difficulty in the uncertainty assessment for this technology; as the future of medicine lies on the metrological quality of the measurements, this represent an issue that should be addressed by the scientific community.


Short Biography

Francesco Scardulla: Graduated in Mechanical Engineering (MSc), obtained a PhD in Technological Innovation Engineering from the University of Palermo, Italy.
His research activity began in 2013 and in 2015 he started his collaboration with the Mechanical and Thermal Measurements Group of the University of Palermo, working on the metrological characteristics of different mechanical and optical sensors for several applications. During his research activity he has collaborated with different research groups, attending Italian and foreign research laboratories such as the Modeling and Scientific Computing Laboratory (MOX) of the Polytechnique of Milan and the Photonics Engineering & Health Technology Research Group of the Loughborough University. Since 2017, in the field of mechanical and thermal measurements, he has been working on a new PPG-based technology that can be integrated into a small device for accurate blood pressure measurements, receiving several national innovation awards. His current research is aimed to study and define the metrological properties of sensors applied to different fields of engineering with particular attention to the photoplethysmographic sensors.


With the Patronage of


Università degli studi di Palermo
unisannio
unisannio
AEIT
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Sponsored By


DEWESoft
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